Advice, Preparation . . . Results™

General

Nonprofits: New alternatives for reporting goodwill and other intangibles

Did you know that the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) recently extended the simplified private-company accounting alternatives to not-for-profit organizations? Many merging nonprofits, including educational institutions and hospitals, welcome these practical expedients. Here are the details.

Alternative for goodwill

The first alternative accounting method allows for the amortization of goodwill on a straight-line basis over 10 years (or less if a shorter useful life is more appropriate). It applies only to:

  • Goodwill recognized in a business combination after initial recognition and measurement,
  • Amounts recognized as goodwill in applying the equity method of accounting, and
  • The excess reorganization value recognized by entities that adopt fresh-start reporting under U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) for reorganizations.

Once an alternative has been elected, the organization must apply all the alternative’s subsequent measurement, derecognition, presentation and disclosure requirements to existing goodwill and all future additions to goodwill that fall within the scope of the accounting alternative.

Upon adoption of the accounting alternative, the organization must decide whether to test goodwill at either the entity level or the reporting unit level. However, annual impairment testing isn’t required under the alternative. Rather, testing for impairment is required only if a triggering event occurs that indicates that the fair value of the nonprofit entity (or the reporting unit) may be below its carrying amount.

Alternative for identifiable intangible assets

The second accounting alternative allows a nonprofit organization to bypass the separate recognition of noncompete agreements and customer-related intangible assets unless they can be sold or licensed independently from other assets of a business. In other words, such items would be considered part of goodwill. Nonprofits that elect this alternative would recognize fewer intangible assets in a business combination.

It applies to nonprofit organizations that are required to recognize or consider fair value of intangible assets when:

  • Applying the acquisition method for a business combination,
  • Evaluating the nature of a difference between an investment’s carrying amount and the underlying equity in the net asset of an investee when applying the equity method of accounting, or
  • Adopting fresh start accounting for reorganizations.

If an organization decides to elect the accounting alternative for accounting for identifiable intangible assets, it also must adopt the accounting alternative for goodwill. However, a nonprofit that elects to adopt the accounting alternative for goodwill isn’t required to adopt the accounting alternative for accounting for identifiable intangible assets.

Effective date and transition

Nonprofits can immediately elect to use these alternative reporting methods. If elected, the goodwill accounting alternative should be applied prospectively to all existing goodwill and for all new goodwill generated in acquisitions. And the alternative for accounting for identifiable intangible assets should be applied prospectively upon the occurrence of the first transaction within the scope of the alternative. Contact us at P&R for more information: Office@CPAsite.com. Our accounting professionals can help determine if these alternatives are right for your organization.

© 2019

The chances of an IRS audit are low, but business owners should be prepared

Many business owners ask: How can I avoid an IRS audit? The good news is that the odds against being audited are in your favor. In fiscal year 2018, the IRS audited approximately 0.6% of individuals. Businesses, large corporations and high-income individuals are more likely to be audited but, overall, audit rates are historically low.

There’s no 100% guarantee that you won’t be picked for an audit, because some tax returns are chosen randomly. However, completing your returns in a timely and accurate fashion with our firm certainly works in your favor. And it helps to know what might catch the attention of the IRS.

Audit red flags

A variety of tax-return entries may raise red flags with the IRS and may lead to an audit. Here are a few examples:

  • Significant inconsistencies between previous years’ filings and your most current filing,
  • Gross profit margin or expenses markedly different from those of other businesses in your industry, and
  • Miscalculated or unusually high deductions.

Certain types of deductions may be questioned by the IRS because there are strict recordkeeping requirements for them ― for example, auto and travel expense deductions. In addition, an owner-employee salary that’s inordinately higher or lower than those in similar companies in his or her location can catch the IRS’s eye, especially if the business is structured as a corporation.

How to respond

If you’re selected for an audit, you’ll be notified by letter. Generally, the IRS won’t make initial contact by phone. But if there’s no response to the letter, the agency may follow up with a call.

Many audits simply request that you mail in documentation to support certain deductions you’ve taken. Others may ask you to take receipts and other documents to a local IRS office. Only the harshest version, the field audit, requires meeting with one or more IRS auditors. (Note: Ignore unsolicited email messages about an audit. The IRS doesn’t contact people in this manner. These are scams.)

Keep in mind that the tax agency won’t demand an immediate response to a mailed notice. You’ll be informed of the discrepancies in question and given time to prepare. You’ll need to collect and organize all relevant income and expense records. If any records are missing, you’ll have to reconstruct the information as accurately as possible based on other documentation.

If the IRS chooses you for an audit, Patrick & Raines CPAs can help you:

  • Understand what the IRS is disputing (it’s not always crystal clear),
  • Gather the specific documents and information needed, and
  • Respond to the auditor’s inquiries in the most expedient and effective manner.

Don’t panic if you’re contacted by the IRS. Many audits are routine. By taking a meticulous, proactive approach to how you track, document and file your company’s tax-related information, you’ll make an audit much less painful and even decrease the chances that one will happen in the first place. In addition, keeping detailed, orderly records minimizes the time (and thus, the expense) it takes to have your CPA assist you in the audit process.

As always, contact us if we can help: Office@CPAsite.com.

© 2019

What to do if your business receives a “no-match” letter



In the past few months, many businesses and employers nationwide have received “no-match” letters from the Social Security Administration (SSA). The purpose of these letters is to alert employers if there’s a discrepancy between the agency’s files and data reported on W-2 forms, which are given to employees and filed with the IRS. Specifically, they point out that an employee’s name and Social Security number (SSN) don’t match the government’s records.

According to the SSA, the purpose of the letters is to “advise employers that corrections are needed in order for us to properly post” employees’ earnings to the correct records. If a person’s earnings are missing, the worker may not qualify for all of the Social Security benefits he or she is entitled to, or the benefit received may be incorrect. The no-match letters began going out in the spring of 2019.

Why discrepancies occur

There are a number of reasons why names and SSNs don’t match. They include typographical errors when inputting numbers and name changes due to marriage or divorce. And, of course, employees could intentionally give the wrong information to employers, as is sometimes the case with undocumented workers.

Some lawmakers, including Democrats on the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee, have expressed opposition to no-match letters. In a letter to the SSA Commissioner, they wrote that, under “the current immigration enforcement climate,” employers might “mistakenly believe that the no-match letter indicates that workers lack immigration status and will fire these workers — even those who can legally work in the United States.”

How to proceed

If you receive a no-match letter telling you that an employee’s name and SSN don’t match IRS records, the SSA gives the following advice:

  • Check to see if your information matches the name and SSN on the employee’s Social Security card. If it doesn’t, ask the employee to provide you with the exact information as it is shown on the card.
  • If the information matches the employee’s card, ask your employee to check with the local Social Security office to resolve the issue.
  • Once resolved, the employee should inform you of any changes.

The SSA notes that the IRS is responsible for any penalties associated with W-2 forms that have incorrect information. If you have questions, contact us or check out these frequently asked questions from the SSA: https://bit.ly/2Yv87M6

© 2019  
If you need accounting or business guidance from a CPA, trust the team at Patrick & Raines CPAs. Let us know if we can help: Office@CPAsite.com or 904-396-5400.


On again, off again overtime rules are finally on again.

Way back in 2016 we told you of new overtime rules the Department of Labor (DOL) was proposing, to begin December 1st that year.  Then, at the 11th hour, a Texas judge issued a temporary injunction, prompted by a suit brought by twenty-one states and multiple organizations.   Had you forgotten about the proposed changes?  Our government didn’t.  Finally, three years later, the DOL has released its final ruling, which will take effect January 1, 2020.

The good news for employers is that the new rules are more modest than the 2016 legislation which set the annual salary of an exempt (from overtime pay) employee at $47,476.  The good news for employees is that they will no longer qualify as exempt for a mere $23,660 per annum.

Beginning in January, 2020 the minimum salary requirement for administrative, professional, and executive exemptions will be the equivalent of $684 per week (or $35,568 per year).  Computer professionals are also covered under this rule, although they may still be paid hourly at a minimum rate of $27.63 per hour.  (This rate hasn’t changed under the new legislation.)

Other rules governing the status of “exempt” employees didn’t change, including the “duties test” –a salaried administrative professional must:

·         Regularly supervise a minimum of two employees

·         Have management as the primary duty of the position

·         Have input into the job status of other employees (such as hiring, firing, or promotions, etc.)

If employees don’t meet these criteria and their salary is less than $684 weekly, they must be paid hourly and receive overtime pay for any time worked in excess of 40 hours per week.

Employers will have the option to use non-discretionary bonuses, incentive payments, and commissions to satisfy up to 10% of the minimum salary requirements.  If, at the end of the year, the employee’s salary plus any other payments (bonuses, commissions, etc.) is less than $35,568, the employer will have one pay period to make up the shortfall.

In the event that state and federal rules differ, follow the more stringent of the two, or consult an attorney about how to classify your employees.

If you need accounting or business guidance from a CPA, trust the team at Patrick & Raines CPAs.  Let us know if we can help:  Office@CPAsite.com or 904-396-5400.

2019 Q4 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and other employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the fourth quarter of 2019. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact Patrick & Raines CPAs to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements.

October 15

  • If a calendar-year C corporation that filed an automatic six-month extension:
    • File a 2018 income tax return (Form 1120) and pay any tax, interest and penalties due.
    • Make contributions for 2018 to certain employer-sponsored retirement plans.

October 31

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for third quarter 2019 (Form 941) and pay any tax due. (See exception below under “November 12.”)

November 12

  • Report income tax withholding and FICA taxes for third quarter 2019 (Form 941), if you deposited on time (and in full) all of the associated taxes due.

December 16

  • If a calendar-year C corporation, pay the fourth installment of 2019 estimated income taxes.

If you need assistance meeting the above deadlines don’t hesitate to make an appointment today by e-mailing Office.com or calling (904) 396-5400.

© 2019


Next Page »

What Our Clients Are Saying

I am pleased with the service and patience we have received. Thanks to your service, we have greater confidence in our financial position. Professional… helpful… cooperative… and accommodating to our …
Dr. Randy T. HodgesHernando Church of the Nazarene

Frequently Asked Questions

Q.

If audited by the IRS, who can represent you?

A.

CPAs, attorneys and a tax professional known as an enrolled agent (EA) are authorized to represent taxpayers in an IRS audit. An EA has proven their competency by passing an...

Read more...

Locations

4029 Atlantic Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida 32207
6000-A Sawgrass Village Circle, Suite 1, Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida 32082

 

Copyright © 2019 Patrick & Raines CPAs, LLC.
All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Use